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Old June 2nd, 2013, 11:10:19 PM   #1
HoldyourfireAl
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Default 3-D Printing


3-D Printing

From: http://news.yahoo.com/3-d-printing-goes-sci-fi-fantasy-reality-133123371.html

SAN MATEO, Calif. (AP) ? Invisalign, a San Jose company, uses 3-D printing to make each mouthful of customized, transparent braces. Mackenzies Chocolates, a confectioner in Santa Cruz, uses a 3-D printer to pump out chocolate molds. And earlier this year, Cornell University researchers used a 3-D printer, along with injections of a special collagen gel, to create a human-shaped ear.
Once a science-fiction fantasy, three-dimensional printers are popping up everywhere from the desks of home hobbyists to Air Force drone research centers. The machines, generally the size of a microwave oven and costing $400 to more than $500,000, extrude layer upon layer of plastics or other materials, including metal, to create 3-D objects with moving parts.
Users are able to make just about anything they like: iPad stands, guitars, jewelry, even guns. But experts warn this cool innovation could soon turn controversial ? because of safety concerns but also the potential for the technology to alter economies that rely on manufacturing.
"We believe that 3-D printing is fundamentally changing the manufacturing ecosystem in its entirety ? how and where products are made and by whom," said Peter Weijmarshausen, CEO of New York-based Shapeways, an online company that makes and sells 3-D printed products designed by individuals. Products include a delicate, twig-like egg cup (cost: $8.10) and a lamp that looks like a nuclear mushroom cloud (cost: $1,388.66).
"We're on the verge of the next industrial revolution, no doubt about it," added Dartmouth College business professor Richard D'Aveni. "In 25 years, entire industries are going to disappear. Countries relying on mass manufacturing are going to find themselves with no revenues and no jobs."
On ground, sea or air, when parts break, new ones can be made on the spot, and even the tools to install them can be made, eliminating the need for staging parts in warehouses around the world, said Jeff DeGrange, vice president of Direct Digital Manufacturing at Stratasys Inc., currently the industry leader in a field of about 50 3-D printer companies.
"We're going to see innovation happening at a much higher rate, introduction of products at a much higher rate," said DeGrange. "We live in an on-demand world now, and we'll see production schedules are going to be greatly compressed."
Airplane mechanics could print a replacement part on the runway. A dishwasher repairman could make a new gasket in his service truck. A surgeon could print a knee implant custom-designed to fit a patient's body.
But the military, D'Aveni said, is likely to be among the first major users of 3-D printers, because of the urgency of warfare.
"Imagine a soldier on a firebase in the mountains of Afghanistan. A squad is attacked by insurgents. The ammunition starts to run out. Is it worth waiting hours and risking the lives of helicopter pilots to drop it near you, or is it worth a more expensive system that can manufacture weapons and ammunition on the spot?" he said.
In the past two years, the U.S. Defense Department has spent more than $2 million on 3-D printers, supplies and upkeep, according to federal contract records. Their uses range from medical research to weapons development. In addition, the Obama administration has launched a $30 million pilot program that includes researching how to use 3-D printing to build weapons parts.
NASA is also wading into this arena, spending $500,000 in the past two years on 3-D printing. Its Lunar Science Institute has published descriptions of how it is exploring the possibility of using the printers to build everything from spacecraft parts while in orbit to a lunar base.
While the U.S. is pursuing the military advantages of 3-D printing, it's also dealing with the potential dangers of the technology. On May 9, the State Department ordered a group to take down online blueprints for a 3-D printable handgun, and federal lawmakers and some state legislatures are contemplating proposals to restrict posting weapons plans in the future.
Since 2007, when these printers first entered the mainstream marketplace, sales have grown by 7.2 percent each year, according to IBIS World, a company that tracks the industry. Sales are projected to jump from about $1.7 billion in 2011 to $3.7 billion in 2015.
Cliff Waldman, a senior economist at the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation, a group that promotes the role of manufacturing in global economies, said it's still too soon to know exactly what impact this 3-D technology could have on more traditional manufacturing. However, he doesn't envision it changing the "fundamental shape" of manufacturing, as others suggest.
"I think 3-D has the capacity to impact both products and processes," he said. "I am not ready to say that it is completely disruptive, however. It might be in a few narrow industries."
Starting in June, office supply chain Staples plans to be the first major retailer to supply 3-D printers with "the Cube," a plug-in device that uses 16 colors and costs $1,299. And in September the smallest and cheapest 3-D printer on the market ? a printing pen priced from $50 ? is due to start shipping. Similar to a glue gun, the 3Doodler plugs into the wall and is filled with cylinders of plastic that come out of a 518-degree Fahrenheit tip. Once the plastic leaves the pen it cools and hardens.
Makers Peter Dilworth, an inventor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Maxwell Bogue, a toy maker, first pitched their pens earlier this year on a website for startup projects. They sought $30,000 and wound up collecting $2.3 million from more than 26,000 investors, who each got one of the 3-D pens. Four artists who teamed up with the men have used the pens to make a mini Eiffel Tower, earrings and butterfly pendants.


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Old June 2nd, 2013, 11:32:32 PM   #2
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wow really cool.


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Old February 10th, 2015, 10:37:50 AM   #3
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I was just thinking about the effect these would have on the statue collecting world? I did a quick search and found this thread from a while ago... do you think this is good for the hobby? Bad for the hobby? As 3D printers become more readily available... hypothetically couldn't the consumer just start making their own statues? Then what happens to the ones we have already collected?


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Old February 10th, 2015, 11:08:16 AM   #4
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3-D printers are going to change our society...and bring on a whole new set of lawsuits for copyright infringement. Randy even mentioned it in one of his interviews.

There won't be stopping someone from taking an existing statue, scanning it, and printing a new one. The only difference will be the material it is made of and they are making advances on that too.

There are pluses though. Budding sculptors can design their own statue and print it out themselves. Lots more products will appear (of varying degrees of quality of course).

For our society it will be much easier to get parts for things. Manufacturers can send you a file and you print your own replacement and/or put the pieces together yourself. Big changes coming but as with all new technology there are some problems.

Sorry to rant and derail the thread. I've been thinking about the effect of this on our society for awhile...


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Old February 10th, 2015, 11:20:57 AM   #5
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I use a Formlabs Form 1 at work it is a SLA machine that prints models from STL files.
The machine prints fine details and has a 5"x5"x6" build envelope. I have not used a 3D sculpting software before but if it creates a STL file it can be printed. I would venture to say traditional sculpting is a thing of the past and just like CAD did away with the drafting table this to will suck the soul out of the renaissance man. Video killed the radio star all over again.
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Old February 10th, 2015, 01:56:38 PM   #6
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And then if the printers can print their own parts IA will be born and nothing can stop Skynet. That is really a joke. But what if they can print their own needs? All we have to do is program it's sensory array to detect faulty Towers (sorry) and build and replace minimizing human interaction. hhhmmmm
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Old February 10th, 2015, 02:25:56 PM   #7
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I'm pretty sure there will always be a market for hand sculpted statues. We don't really need 2-D artwork that was actually made with a paintbrush, but we still buy traditional paintings. I could download books onto my iPad, but I like to hold the book in my hand. With Common Core curriculum in the schools now, technology is at the forefront. Tech has to be integrated into every lesson, in all subjects, so 3-D printing, like BZ said, will be making some major changes in people's lives. Even though we like our "gadgets" and love seeing what we can do with them, the hands-on approach will always be appreciated and admired. IMO. I do own some of the Bowen 3-D sculpted statues, like Taskmaster, and I really like them. I think I would like them a little more if they were sculpted by hand though.
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Old February 10th, 2015, 04:42:47 PM   #8
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They are already doing some amazing things with 3D printers. They can now print metals and something that is really amazing body parts. Say you loose an ear they scan and measure the other ear print the new ear with a small bit of your DNA in the print material so your body will not reject it and once attached the new ear graphs in fine.
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Old February 10th, 2015, 04:58:05 PM   #9
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^seriously? Wow...I did not know that. I guess the future really is now.

As far as statues are concerned...3D sculpts are often 'cleaner' than hand-sculpts, but 3D sculpting also detract from the art of it in my opinion. It'll definitely be interesting to see where it takes the hobby...I'm not especially looking forward to it.
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Old February 10th, 2015, 07:59:09 PM   #10
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3D printing is just now beginning to be affordable for home based machines.
Makerbot creates a 3D printer and a 3D scanner to scan objects to duplicate.
Their entry level machines heat plastic through a nozzle and layers it to form a model.
Formlabs is another company that uses a totally different method that is the gold standard of 3D printing.
The Form 1 machine uses a tub of UV sensitive resin that cures when a UV laser hits the resin.
Check out Youtube sometime it's pretty neat.
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Old February 11th, 2015, 07:28:09 AM   #11
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All of you bring up a lot of good points! I actually really like the 3D scanned statues and never thought it took away from anything. Mister H, I especially like your points about how we still appreciate a book while there are e-readers, or a painting when there are pictures etc.

I did know about all the incredible achievements happening with 3D printers, they have even been able to build a giant 3D printer that can actually "print" a house, and they have also been able to "print" food!

My concern was more so how it may affect the hobby in general, and specifically to you. I don't expect super high quality 3D printers to be mass marketed for a few years, but when they are, it kind of worries me in a way. If someone has a 3D printer, and can just download a sketch and make their own statue, why would anyone spend hundreds to buy one from any of our favourite companies/designers? Would there be no aftermarket for these collectibles?
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Old February 11th, 2015, 02:49:49 PM   #12
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Check this sh!t out... Welcome to 3Doodler - The 3Doodler
A pen that prints what you draw.
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Old February 12th, 2015, 07:18:54 AM   #13
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That is pretty crazy!
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Old February 12th, 2015, 08:32:15 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conquest4statues View Post
Check this sh!t out... Welcome to 3Doodler - The 3Doodler
A pen that prints what you draw.
STFU..!!! That's cray cray....

My kids hate it when I say, "That's cray cray"....


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Old March 2nd, 2015, 11:56:08 PM   #15
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The possible economic impact of 3D printing is huge.

Once these become common there is no way anyone can keep folks from making guns with them. They aren't complicated. If people can sculpt what they want they can sculpt out the parts. It's that simple. Obviously this concerns some folks. Less of us in the American mid-west where most of us already have guns.

Making ammo with a 3D printer sounds far fetched while you are under fire. I'd be concerned about having the building blocks for large amount of gunpowder/propellant in the device. Your lead/steel cores are also going to be hefty. They don't do ex nihilo creation. I could see having a set up at the FOB or base where they could make what they need and move it around quickly.

I'd still pay Randy to create the sculpt. Just having the printer won't grant me the ability to sculpt like he does. But, this way I can buy the electrons of his work and then print at my house instead of waiting a year for it to be made in China and shipped to me. Or he can print and mail when an order comes into the warehouse. Cut out the Chinese.
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